Lady Hale’s tale is a concept in self-belief. We want a lot more like her in jobs of energy

Lady Hale’s tale is a concept in self-belief. We want a lot more like her in jobs of energy

The motto of our very very first female legislation lord is ‘women are equal to everything’. Now we should provide everyone else the opportunity to show it

‘Hale could effortlessly have already been cowed by the cocky men that are young her college supervisions, or disheartened by their adult equivalents inside her job. Yet she was stood by her ground.’

Photograph: Kevin Leighton

‘Hale can potentially have already been cowed because of the cocky teenage boys in her college supervisions, or disheartened by their adult equivalents inside her profession. Yet she was stood by her ground.’

Photograph: Kevin Leighton

Last modified on Fri 20 Dec 2019 19.02 GMT

Brenda Hale just went in to the legislation because her headteacher informed her she wasn’t clever enough to see history.

She felt a little overawed on coming up to Cambridge in the 1960s and finding it full of blithely confident young men behaving as if a place at the university was merely their due so it’s no surprise. It had been only if she excelled in her own first-year exams that the girl that would fundamentally become the UK’s female that is first lord and later president for the supreme court realised she may be quite great at this, most likely.

The motto she later adopted on visit into the House of Lords – Omnia feminae aequissimae, or “women are equal to every thing” – appears to have offered as a reminder of this very early, vital concept in perhaps perhaps perhaps not being tricked by hollow self- self- self- confidence. Or as she recently place it, “I encountered numerous teenage boys from general general public college backgrounds whom felt eligible to good jobs.

Continue reading